Today I'm sharing how to deep clean your kitchen in nine easy steps, from defrosting the freezer, how you clean your washing machine, how to clean plugholes and organising your kitchen.

Call it the Mrs Hinch effect if you like, but the power of the cleaning-mad Instagram star has sent me into a scrubbing frenzy. Having spent the best part of the weekend cleaning my flat from ceiling to floor – no really, no surface was left untouched including the lights and skirting boards – I wanted to share a post today on how to deep clean your kitchen. Because, if I’m honest, it’s probably the most therapeutic room to clean in my opinion.

Old food, tins and packets

Starting at the very beginning, I’d suggest getting a bin liner and going through every single tin, packet or bag of food you have and see what is past its sell-by date. Take everything out, open jars, check for mould, even check your spices. I had spices in my cupboards that were out of date in 2016 people and I’m a relatively tidy person. And even better, if there are tin’s of food you’ve bought but you know you’ll never eat (chickpeas I’m looking at you), then donate them to your closest food bank.

Clean & defrost your fridge freezer

I’d suggest doing this deep clean on a day when you’re running low on food. Why? Because you’ll need to defrost your freezer and there’s no point attempting that unless you have somewhere to store all your food while the ice melts. Lay plenty of old towels down, empty the trays and wash them, and turn the freezer off until it has defrosted. Once that’s done you have my permission to fill it back up with Ben & Jerry’s again.

Disinfect the bin

Not the most glamorous of tasks but taking the time to disinfect your bin properly will stop all sorts of smells and germs spreading. I like to pour bleach to the bottom of the bin with a kettle full of boiling water over the top. Leave that outside or somewhere near an open window while you clean the rest of the kitchen. Once that’s done, you can pop on some gloves, grab a long-handled scrubbing brush and clean the inside. Pour the water out and use the shower or a hose outside to rinse down. Make sure there’s no water left inside the bin when you put a new bin liner in or it will start to smell.

Go through cupboards

Do you really need all those bowls, plates and mugs? My cupboards used to be crammed full of serving platters, cake stands, dishes, baking bowls – you name it, I had it – until I realised I hadn’t used most of them since the day I bought them. I haven’t served anything on a platter full stop. And I bet you’re the same. So, take some time to go through your cupboards and organise bits that could go to the charity shop. And while each cupboard is empty, take cleaning spray and wipe the inside before putting back your edited selection of kitchenware.

Washing machine clean

How often do you wash your washing machine? Not often I bet. All you need to do is add two capfuls of white vinegar designed for cleaning (Stardrops from Home Bargains is brilliant) to the drum, and then a capful of bicarbonate soda to the compartment where you’d normally put your powder. Place on a normal wash and the mixture should clean your washing machine through. Once that’s done, clean the inside of the door, take the powder compartment out and give it a good soap, and finally wipe down the front of the washing machine.

Clean your plugholes

A quick tip for cleaning your plugs is adding a dishwasher tablet to each one and pour over boiling water. If you’re looking for a deeper clean though, add soda crystals, a capful of Zaflora and again pour over with boiling water. If you’re not keen on using more chemicals, boil 9 cups worth of water and pour 8 of those down the drain. Add half a cupful of baking soda, followed by a cupful of normal vinegar. Leave to rest for 10-15 minutes before rinsing with 8 more cups of boiling water.

Wipe all surfaces

Now we’re at the part of the deep clean where you really see all your hard work come to fruition. Clear every surface and scrub away any dirt or grime, starting with the hob where you can leave your cleaning product on a little longer for stubborn marks. Wash chopping boards, knife racks etc, and use disinfectant wipes (B&M have these for 50p for 100) to clean things like the kettle, toaster, and canisters. Once everything is cleaned thoroughly, I’d suggest purely for aesthetic reasons buying a stainless-steel spray and using this on your sink, cooker and microwave if needed to make the space really shine.

Organisation

Once all the surfaces are cleaned, you’ll be able to get your organisation head on and work out what needs to go where to have a better flow in your kitchen. Do you really need all those cooking books out on the side gathering dust? Or perhaps you could buy a really nice cookbook stand and have your favourite out on display, swapping and changing as you go on? Again, how about buying glass jars and decanting all your half-full packets of pasta, rice, flour, sugar etc and keeping them organised in the cupboard. Another idea to organise your pantry/condiments cupboard is to have a spinning spice rack so you’re not rooting through the whole cupboard when you’re trying to find a pinch of nutmeg.

Finally the floor

Finally, take your disinfectant wipes and wipe all around the edge of your skirting and flooring. This is often a part of the kitchen which is left untouched and as your mop can’t reach certain spaces, this is a great idea for a truly deep kitchen clean. Once you’ve cleaned the edge, use your chosen floor cleaner and mop the rest of the space, leaving to dry completely before you add the bin.

Has that put your in the mood to clean? It certainly has me. I think having a clean, sparkling kitchen can be so good for your mental health, and it definitely eases any anxiety I might have when I wake up to a clean home, ready for a new week ahead. Let me know if this has inspired you to deep clean your kitchen.

In case you missed it: Kitchen Renovation Plans For My Future House | How To Decorate A Small Kitchen On A Budget | Updating My Kitchen With Smeg